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In the 35 Years of Spirit Chain Competition between Fairmont and Centerville, the two schools have raised more than $2.5 million! Interior of Fairmont’s New Auditorium The Marching Firebirds and Firebird Football at Roush Stadium Indian Riffle Elementary Student Council Members Celebrate their School's "National Blue Ribbon" Status Fairmont Auditorium We are the FIREBIRDS! "Don't Count the Days. Make the Days Count" Is Digital Design Instructor, Jared Parker's, Mantra Fairmont Career Tech Center -- Try what you want to do and be for free! A Kettering Teacher Works One-on-One with her Student Turf Field at Roush Stadium, Home of the Firebirds Kettering Bus Drivers Log more than 600,000 Route Miles a Year Kettering has Once Again Been Named a 'Best Communities for Music Education' Fairmont Park, home of Firebird Soccer, Field Hockey and Lacrosse
In the 35 Years of Spirit Chain Competition between Fairmont and Centerville, the two schools have raised more than $2.5 million! Interior of Fairmont’s New Auditorium The Marching Firebirds and Firebird Football at Roush Stadium Indian Riffle Elementary Student Council Members Celebrate their School's "National Blue Ribbon" Status Fairmont Auditorium We are the FIREBIRDS! "Don't Count the Days. Make the Days Count" Is Digital Design Instructor, Jared Parker's, Mantra Fairmont Career Tech Center -- Try what you want to do and be for free! A Kettering Teacher Works One-on-One with her Student Turf Field at Roush Stadium, Home of the Firebirds Kettering Bus Drivers Log more than 600,000 Route Miles a Year Kettering has Once Again Been Named a 'Best Communities for Music Education' Fairmont Park, home of Firebird Soccer, Field Hockey and Lacrosse

Department of Food & Nutrition Services

Come Eat with Us and See our #TALKINGFRUITBASKET
Stacie Pabst
Supervisor of Food and Nutrition Services

(937) 499-1446
stacie.pabst@ketteringschols.org

What's on your Child's Tray? The new school meal nutrition standards are having a positive impact on student food selection and consumption, especially for fruits and vegetables. 

  • Children participating in school meals are less likely to have nutrient inadequacies and are more likely to consume fruit, vegetables, and milk at breakfast and lunch.
  • Students who eat both school breakfast and lunch have significantly better overall diet quality than students who do not eat school meals.
  • The new school meal nutrition standards are having a positive impact on student food selection and consumption, especially for fruits and vegetables.
  • Few packed lunches and snacks brought from home meet National School Lunch Program standards.

Why are School Meals Important? A wide body of research supports the health and educational benefits of participation in the National School Lunch Program. Studies show that participation in school lunch reduces food insecurity, obesity rates, and poor health.

  • Children participating in school meals are less likely to have nutrient inadequacies and are more likely to consume fruit, vegetables, and milk at breakfast and lunch.
  • Participation in federally-funded child care nutrition or school meals provided in child care, preschool, school, or summer settings is associated with a significantly lower body mass index (BMI) among young, low-income children
  • Based on national data, economists estimate that the receipt of a free or reduced-price school lunch reduces obesity rates by at least 17 percent.
  • Behavioral, emotional, and mental health, and academic problems are more prevalent among children and adolescents struggling with hunger.
  • Children with hunger are more likely to have repeated a grade, received special education services, or received mental health counseling, than low-income children who do not experience hunger

 

DID YOU KNOW YOU CAN GET ALL YOUR NUTRITION SERVICES NEEDS ONLINE!


FOOD & NUTRITION CONTACT INFORMATION:

937-499-1446
Stacie Pabst, MS, RD, LD
stacie.pabst@ketteringschools.org
500 Lincoln Park Blvd.
Kettering, Ohio  45429

 

Non-Discrimination Statement

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339.  Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at:  http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1)   mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2)   fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3)  email: program.intake@usda.gov.



This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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